Writing Contests—Time is of Essence

SOURCE:       https://www.pw.org/grants

University of Louisville

Copper Nickel

Cash Prize: $2,000
Entry Fee: $25
Application Deadline: 10/15/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $2,000 and publication by Milkweed Editions is given annually for a first or second poetry collection. Victoria Chang will judge. Using the online submission system…

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River Teeth

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $25
Application Deadline: 10/15/17

A prize of $1,000 and publication by University of New Mexico Press is given annually for a book of creative nonfiction. Submit a manuscript of 150 to 400 pages with a $25…

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Silverfish Review Press

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $25
Application Deadline: 10/15/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,000, publication by Silverfish Review Press, and 25 author copies is given annually for a first poetry collection. Poets who have not published a full-length…

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San Diego Poetry Annual

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $15
Application Deadline: 10/15/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,000, publication in San Diego Poetry Annual will be given annually for a poem. The winner will also receive an invitation to read at an award ceremony in…

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A Public Space

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $0
Application Deadline: 10/15/17

Three six-month fellowships of $1,000 each, publication in A Public Space, mentorship from an established author, and optional workspace in the journal’s Brooklyn, New…

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Songs of Eretz Poetry Review

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $20
Application Deadline: 10/15/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,000 and publication in Songs of Eretz Poetry Review will be given annually for a single poem or a group of poems. Published and unpublished poems are…

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Barnard College

Cash Prize: $1,500
Entry Fee: $20
Application Deadline: 10/15/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,500 and publication by Norton is given biennially for a second poetry collection by a U.S. woman poet. Rosanna Warren will judge. Submit three copies of a…

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Amy Lowell Poetry Traveling Scholarship

Cash Prize: $58,000
Entry Fee: $0
Application Deadline: 10/15/17
Genre: Poetry

An award of approximately $58,000 is given annually to a U.S. poet for a year of travel and study abroad. Submit two copies of up to 40 pages of poetry or a published book and…

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Coffee-House Poetry

Cash Prize: $2,600
Entry Fee: $8
Application Deadline: 10/16/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of £2,000 (approximately $2,600) is given annually for a poem. A second-place prize of £1,000 (approximately $1,300) is also given. Both winners receive publication on…

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Omnidawn Publishing

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $10
Application Deadline: 10/17/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,000 and publication in OmniVerse, Omnidawn Publishing’s online journal, is given annually for a poem. The winner also receives 50 copies of a letterpress…

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Cutthroat

Cash Prize: $1,300
Entry Fee: $20
Application Deadline: 10/20/17

Three prizes of $1,300 each and publication in Cutthroat are given annually for a group of poems, a short story, and an essay. Cornelius Eady will judge the Joy Harjo…

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Omnidawn Publishing

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $18
Application Deadline: 10/23/17
Genre: Fiction

A prize of $1,000, publication by Omnidawn Publishing, and 100 author copies is given annually for a work of fabulist fiction. Lily Hoang will judge. Submit a manuscript of one…

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Sixfold

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $5
Application Deadline: 10/24/17
Genre: PoetryFiction

Two prizes of $1,000 each and publication in Sixfold are given quarterly for a group of poems and a short story. Using the online submission system, submit up to five…

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Finishing Line Press

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $15
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,000 and publication by Finishing Line Press is given annually for a poetry chapbook. Submit a manuscript of up to 30 pages with a $15 entry fee by October 31. All…

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University of North Texas Press

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $25
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,000 and publication by University of North Texas Press is given annually for a poetry collection. Rosanna Warren will judge. Using the online submission system,…

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Comstock Review

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $30
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,000, publication by the Comstock Writers Group, and 50 author copies is given biennially for a poetry chapbook. Kathleen Bryce Niles-Overton will judge. Submit a…

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Poetry Society of the United Kingdom

Cash Prize: $6,500
Entry Fee: $8
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of £5,000 (approximately $6,500) and publication on the Poetry Society of the United Kingdom website is given annually for a poem. A second-place prize of £2,000 (…

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Persea Books

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $30
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,000 and publication by Persea Books is given annually for a first poetry collection by a woman who is a U.S. citizen or permanent resident. The winner also…

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Elixir Press

Cash Prize: $2,000
Entry Fee: $30
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $2,000 and publication by Elixir Press is given annually for a poetry collection. A second-place prize of $1,000 and publication is also awarded. Kathleen Winter…

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American Poetry Review

Cash Prize: $3,000
Entry Fee: $25
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $3,000 and publication by American Poetry Review is given annually for a first poetry collection. The winning book is distributed by Copper Canyon Press…

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Glimmer Train Press

Cash Prize: $2,500
Entry Fee: $18
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Fiction

A prize of $2,500 and publication in Glimmer Train Stories is given three times yearly for a short story by a writer whose fiction has not appeared in a print…

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PEN/Faulkner Foundation

Cash Prize: $15,000
Entry Fee: $0
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Fiction

A prize of $15,000 is given annually for a book of fiction published during the current year. Four finalists will each receive $5,000. The winner and finalists will also be…

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Indiana Review

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $20
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Fiction

A prize of $1,000 and publication in Indiana Review is given annually for a short story. Submit a story of up to 8,000 words with a $20 entry fee, which includes a…

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Tupelo Press

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $25
Application Deadline: 10/31/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,000 and publication by Tupelo Press is given annually for a poetry chapbook. Submit a manuscript of 20 to 36 pages with a $25 entry fee by October 31. Visit the…

Silverfish Review Press

Cash Prize: $1,000
Entry Fee: $25
Application Deadline: 10/15/17
Genre: Poetry

A prize of $1,000, publication by Silverfish Review Press, and 25 author copies is given annually for a first poetry collection. Poets who have not published a full-length…

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San Diego Poetry Annual

‘Hi, Guys!”

Copyright
©Jane H. Johann, 2017, Countryside,
Washington.

I am fully aware that Emily Post is no longer alive; however, for those interested, there is actually an Emily Post site: http://emilypost.com/.  But I have a funny feeling that those who read this are not in need of that site and those who should read it, will never read it. Despite the site, Miss Manners must have flown the coop! I am extremely tired of being addressed as a “guy!”

I went to a US Cellular store in Menomonee Falls with my friend. She wanted to buy an I-phone and asked me to accompany her. We both are senior people and there were three other women with similar ages in the store. It is a small store. We walked in and the Customer Representative, who was male, shouted out, “Hi, guys, what can I do for you?”

I stood for a moment in silence. You do realize this is a pet peeve of mine and I have refrained from expressing my true feelings more times than I can count. Then my mouth opened, “First of all, we are not “guys!” and secondly, we would like to see your I-phones.”

Of course, the young man looked bewildered but sensed I was annoyed and apologized. We then proceeded to buy the phone.

On another occasion, I was dining with my daughter. The waitress came to our table and say, “Hi, guys! Here’s the menu!” Not wanting to embarrass my daughter, I was silent, but raging inside!

I could give countless stories that illustrate these phenomena of young people rolling off their tongues, “H, guys!”   I know we live in another age. I know politeness seems to have disappeared. I see young women being exploited at every turn–in fashion and in speech.

Is it too late to turn back the tide on this expression?

I thought it might be a regional thing in Wisconsin, but somehow the expression followed me to Fairhaven, Washington,  on the West coast this past June.

Am I the only person who feels this way? Am I being overly sensitive? What happened to the identity of women?

Perhaps I should book myself for the next flight to Mars and help colonize a new civilization.  Parents could be given an e-book site or manual with proper etiquette as they leave the birthing center.

Wordless Wednesday

 

Copyright
©Jane H. Johann
Bellingham, WA. 2017

 

Copyright
©Jane H. Johann
Bellingham, WA. 2017

 

Copyright
©Jane H. Johann
Bellingham, WA. 2017

 

 

 

 

 

 

Copyright
©Jane H. Johann
Bellingham, WA. 2017

Copyright
©Jane H. Johann
Bellingham, WA. 2017

Copyright
©Jane H. Johann
Bellingham, WA. 2017

Copyright
©Jane H. Johann
Bellingham, WA. 2017

Copyright
©Jane H. Johann
Bellingham, WA. 2017

Authentic Voice

Copyright October 2016
©Jane H. Johann
“Lake Michigan Unfolding” No.6

I am a part-time blogger, maybe even less than that recently…ha! My youngest daughter says that she is bored with my writing and that I need to put a little more authenticity into it. She is attempting to make me an honest writer. She says she is not interested in reading about mountains and streams.  I reminded her of a little sign I have at home: “NOVELIST AT WORK–You may end up in my writing! Beware and speak softly.”

One of the reasons I lack putting my voice out there among the millions of bloggers is probably a common theme for writers. I fear revealing too much of who I am and then being questioned.  But now that I made it to 67, what have I got to lose?  I also fear that I do not live up to my writing.  I may write happy things, profound words, urging others to social action; however, then I have to live it also.  People are disappointed with me, and I with myself, because the action behind the words is so far from my reach. Depression is a horrible thing.  It grabs hold of your spirit, drags you down into the mud—but like the lotus flower, I have to bloom.  So out of the mud I am crawling today and attempting more honesty in my writing.

I do admit that I try extremely hard to write only positive and encouraging words. I think there is so much rubbish and sorrow in the media–why add to it?   Many times I write these for myself, because I actually need to hear them.  I need to find joy and hope and so I write about it. My writing forces me to think positive.  But then of course, if I do write something positive, then I am reminded by not too few, that I need to stop worrying and eat my words!  Writing always comes back to you. You think you are giving the words away, but you are ultimately held captive by them.

Several years ago I wrote a one-liner about “hope” on Google share drive. I believe it was, “We have to keep hope alive!” I completely forgot I had written it. And there was one comment: “Instead of writing about hope, get off your butt and do something!”

And I do get angry when someone tells me after meeting me, who beforehand only knew me through my blog: “You are not at all what I expected!”  I felt terrible I was such a disappointment in the flesh! I think fear is why I haven’t written.  I do suffer from depression and social anxiety (a strange mixture) and am a very shy person—no one believes that after meeting me.  That is only because I do try to run past my shyness and jump into the middle of life.  Sometimes that jump brought me grief because I was too impulsive. Other times, it gave me happy experiences and encounters I never would have had, had I held back.  However, after I make my impulsive move, I am exhausted!  It takes an insurmountable amount of energy to make that leap.  I am more comfortable with a few people than a group–and my anxiety is easier to control. And, yes, I stood in front of a classroom of students for 36 years. It took a lot of energy. So I guess it says this to those who are depressed, yes, it is hell, but take the chance! Make the leap!

I will say this about my writing. Anything I write is 99% a reminder to myself of love in the world, the kindness of people, beauty in nature, and hope in the world–even if I am sitting on my butt!  I did actually cry when I read that one line– Sometimes believing is the only thing I have to offer!  Then I think of the great cello player, who I admire very much and wish that I was like him, who each evening, would play his cello in wartorn Serbia:

“Twenty years ago, as mortar shells began raining down on Sarajevo, killing his friends and neighbors, Vedran Smajlovic did what he knew best to help the city: he played his cello at funerals, in bomb shelters and in the streets…” http://www.wqxr.org/story/197875-cellist-sarajevo-plays-his-city-again/